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Can today's house officers teach effectively? An assessment in undergraduate emergency training.
Eur J Emerg Med. 2015 Jun; 22(3):215-8.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous publications describe house officers (HOs) as unaware of their ineffective teaching skills.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of teaching seniority in the comparison of teaching skills between HOs and faculty.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Ten HOs (F: n=4, M: n=6, age: 35.1±6.8 years) and nine faculty (F: n=3, M: n=6, age: 41.4±4.9 years) who actively teach undergraduate emergency medicine were immediately evaluated at the end of the course by their students using the questionnaire SFDP26. The questionnaire consists of one item on 'overall teaching effectiveness' (OTE) (1=very poor to 5=excellent) and 25 items measured on a five-point Likert scale (1-5=strongly disagree to strongly agree) divided into seven subscales: 1, 'establishing the learning climate' (LC); 2, 'control of session' (CS); 3, 'communication of goals' (CG); 4, 'facilitating understanding and retention' (UR); 5, 'evaluation' (E); 6, 'feedback' (FB) and 7, 'promoting self-directed learning' (SL). The sample included 173 medical students in their third year of training who were randomly assigned to the instructors. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to calculate group-related differences (resident vs. teaching faculty). For significant differences, effect size was calculated (r=Z/√N).

RESULTS

No sex-related differences were found. Significantly better ratings for HOs were found in subscales: 1, 'LC' (P=0.001; r=0.20); 2, 'CS' (P=0.037; r=0.15); 5, 'E' (P=0.007; r=0.20); 6, 'FB' (P=0.001; r=0.23); 7, 'SL' (P=0.004; r=0.24) and 'OTE' (P=0.027; r=0.26).

CONCLUSION

From a learner's perspective, the quality of teaching provided by HOs was rated at least similar and mostly better overall than that provided by faculty. These findings contradict results from previous studies on the quality of HO teaching and therefore warrant further assessment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck Medical School, Luebeck bInstitute for Teaching and Educational Research in Health Sciences, University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten cDepartment of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24910962

Citation

Iblher, Peter, et al. "Can Today's House Officers Teach Effectively? an Assessment in Undergraduate Emergency Training." European Journal of Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine, vol. 22, no. 3, 2015, pp. 215-8.
Iblher P, Zupanic M, Karsten J, et al. Can today's house officers teach effectively? An assessment in undergraduate emergency training. Eur J Emerg Med. 2015;22(3):215-8.
Iblher, P., Zupanic, M., Karsten, J., & Brauer, K. (2015). Can today's house officers teach effectively? An assessment in undergraduate emergency training. European Journal of Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine, 22(3), 215-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/MEJ.0000000000000142
Iblher P, et al. Can Today's House Officers Teach Effectively? an Assessment in Undergraduate Emergency Training. Eur J Emerg Med. 2015;22(3):215-8. PubMed PMID: 24910962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can today's house officers teach effectively? An assessment in undergraduate emergency training. AU - Iblher,Peter, AU - Zupanic,Michaela, AU - Karsten,Jan, AU - Brauer,Kirk, PY - 2014/6/10/entrez PY - 2014/6/10/pubmed PY - 2016/4/12/medline SP - 215 EP - 8 JF - European journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine JO - Eur J Emerg Med VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous publications describe house officers (HOs) as unaware of their ineffective teaching skills. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of teaching seniority in the comparison of teaching skills between HOs and faculty. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten HOs (F: n=4, M: n=6, age: 35.1±6.8 years) and nine faculty (F: n=3, M: n=6, age: 41.4±4.9 years) who actively teach undergraduate emergency medicine were immediately evaluated at the end of the course by their students using the questionnaire SFDP26. The questionnaire consists of one item on 'overall teaching effectiveness' (OTE) (1=very poor to 5=excellent) and 25 items measured on a five-point Likert scale (1-5=strongly disagree to strongly agree) divided into seven subscales: 1, 'establishing the learning climate' (LC); 2, 'control of session' (CS); 3, 'communication of goals' (CG); 4, 'facilitating understanding and retention' (UR); 5, 'evaluation' (E); 6, 'feedback' (FB) and 7, 'promoting self-directed learning' (SL). The sample included 173 medical students in their third year of training who were randomly assigned to the instructors. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to calculate group-related differences (resident vs. teaching faculty). For significant differences, effect size was calculated (r=Z/√N). RESULTS: No sex-related differences were found. Significantly better ratings for HOs were found in subscales: 1, 'LC' (P=0.001; r=0.20); 2, 'CS' (P=0.037; r=0.15); 5, 'E' (P=0.007; r=0.20); 6, 'FB' (P=0.001; r=0.23); 7, 'SL' (P=0.004; r=0.24) and 'OTE' (P=0.027; r=0.26). CONCLUSION: From a learner's perspective, the quality of teaching provided by HOs was rated at least similar and mostly better overall than that provided by faculty. These findings contradict results from previous studies on the quality of HO teaching and therefore warrant further assessment. SN - 1473-5695 UR - https://news.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24910962/Can_today's_house_officers_teach_effectively_An_assessment_in_undergraduate_emergency_training_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -